Pursuit of Passion Projects


I read a book that validated so much of what we do at SPARK! It was so exciting I could hardly sit still to read. Thankfully, it was a quick but powerful read, because I literally jumped up every few pages to share a thought with my husband.

Lifelong Kindergarten: Cultivating Creativity through Projects, Passion, Peers and Play, by Mitchell Resnick was published in 2017. Not only do Mitchell Resnick’s words align with our approach to igniting creativity in children, but the foreword to the book is written by Sir Ken Robinson, the ultimate authority on teaching creativity; and creatively.

SPARK! had been open almost three years and the question I get asked the most is, “Does technology kill creativity?” My thoughts are, not only is technology a product of creativity, but it continually builds on our creative energies and in many ways, enhances them. And that’s why, in December 2018, we launched the Creator Studio to offer learning and innovation through technology.

In his foreword, Robinson shares, “Mitchell Resnick has spent his professional life exploring the synergies between creativity and technology…He dispels common myths about creativity (that it is confined to the arts, for example)…” I believe this book was the spark that brought our Creator Studio to life.

In the Creator Studio, we’ve adopted Resnick’s proclivity to alliteration and provide a space for children “in Pursuit of Passion Projects.” Here, SPARK! gives children the freedom to learn new skills, develop their own ideas and pursue their passion without deadlines, judgement or grades. Resnick talks about how children really are willing to take risks and try new things when these limiting factors are removed. He says, “They’re eager to define their own problems rather than simply solve the ones in the textbook. It’s students who come up with the most innovative ideas and creative new directions.”

SPARK! defines the creative process as Inspiration, with Iteration and Collaboration, leads to Innovation. When I share this verbally, I move my hands in intertwining and repeat circles to indicate that the creative process is not linear, but rather circuitous. Inspiration happens more than once in a project and collaboration might happen at any point. The creative process is not a 4-point line from A to Z. I once asked an artist to render our creative process as a tornado. Resnick illustrates his philosophy in a “Creative Learning Spiral,”

and goes on to say, “The Creative Learning Spiral is the engine of creative thinking. As kindergarten children go through the spiral, they develop and refine their abilities as creative thinkers. They learn to develop their own ideas, try them out, experiment with alternatives, get input from others, and generate new ideas based on their experiences.”
Thank you, Mitchell, for the validation of SPARK! programming, and for the spark to bring the Creator Studio to life.

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